Excited to Read!

The third book in the John Dies At the End series by David Wong! It came out October 3rd; I’ve already downloaded a copy to my Nook and now I’m just waiting for the weekend when I can read it! The first two are amazing, if you haven’t read them yet — I’ve reviewed the first one already (here) and I’ll review the second one soon!

Some other new books I’m excited to check out:

  • Rhett and Link’s Book of Mythicality (my husband is obsessed with their podcast)
  • The Rules of Magic by Alice Hoffman (love pretty much everything this lady writes)
  • Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward (I haven’t read anything from her, but I’m always attracted to good titles and this one is gorgeous)

What books are you excited about? Let me know below!

 

Beautiful Words #6

Some beautiful words for your week . . .

“No, war is never about killing the enemy. War is about remaking the world to suit the whims of some powerful group over the whims of some other powerful group. The dead are just the sparks that fly from the metal as they grind it down.” (This Book is Full of Spiders, David Wong)

“I’m afraid that some times you’ll play lonely games too. Games you can’t win ’cause you’ll play against you.” (Oh, The Places You’ll Go!, Dr. Seuss)

“It’s a long hard road ahead for you, little warrior. Enjoy a happy day while you can.” (Martin the Warrior, Brian Jacques)

“It would be, for me, mere pointless pleasure, an illusion of order for this one frail, foolish, flicker-flash in the long dull fall of eternity.” (Grendel, John Gardner)

John Dies At The End

Title: John Dies At The End
Author: David Wong
Publisher: St. Martin’s Press

It says book club right in the title, so, like any book club, I think I can assume you’ve read it even if you’re only here for some alcohol & snacks. (My fave? Hard cider + snickerdoodles). I’m going to exercise that prerogative now, so skip to the next paragraph if you’re not interested in spoilers: I cannot figure out why the title is “John Dies At The End” when he, basically, is the only one that doesn’t. I suspect that there is some cool, meta reading of the novel that solves this problem for me but I don’t know what it is. I suspect neither David or John would be concerned about it. The two are the most blasé guys I’ve ever met – and yes, I did mean “met.” You can totally meet fictional characters. Let me live.

Anyway, for being an underachieving slacker, David (both the pen name of Jason Pargin, the author, and the name of the protagonist), has a lot of virtues: he’s good with dogs, he takes care of intoxicated friends, he’s respectful to women, and he shows up on time to work most of the time. On the other hand, he makes some dumb mistakes. Which leads me to one of my favorite things about this book: the characters (well, the human ones) feel so real. There aren’t any characters that don’t have any flaws.

This book essentially covers two separate but related stories: the first is John and David’s discovery of “soy sauce,” the monsters that come from it, and trip to Vegas – funny, fast-moving, unpredictable chaos. The second story is the best (at least in my opinion): the monsters re-appear, causing chaos and confusion, and John and David bumble their way towards saving the world (and the girl). If you’re feeling kind of “eh” on the first story, stick around for the second. It’s a fast read, and you won’t regret it.

You’ve probably already realized this, but just as a warning: this book is weird. It probably fits best in the “science fiction” category, but it has some horror flavoring and some of the segues more typical of literary fiction. The opening “riddle” is a good litmus test – if you find it intriguing, you are in for a treat. If you think it’s dumb, this may not be the book for you.

Let me know what you think – happy reading!

Beautiful Words #1

Some beautiful words for the week . . .

“Let’s say you have an ax. Just a cheap one, from Home Depot. On one bitter winter day, you use said ax to behead a man. Don’t worry, the man was already dead. Or maybe you should worry, because you’re the one that shot him.” (John Dies at the End, David Wong).

“And we’ll be saying a big hello to all intelligent life forms everyone . . . and to everyone else out there, the secret is to bang the rocks together, guys.” (The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams).

“‘Now and then, though, someone does begin to grow differently. Instead of down, his feet grow up toward the sky. But we do our best to discourage awkward things like that.’ ‘What happens to them?'” insisted Milo. ‘Oddly enough, they often grow ten times the size of everyone else,’ said Alec thoughtfully, ‘and I’ve heard that they walk among the stars.'” (The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster).

“She starched and ironed her face, forming it into just what people wanted to see.” (Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston).